Minnesota Bear Bait Station Regulations

Nancy B. Alston

Minnesota is one of the current US states that allow bear baiting by bear hunters. However, they have specific laws and regulations regarding this type of hunting practice. These regulations must be followed at all times; failure to due so can result in heavy fines and loss of hunting privileges. This article will explain the basics of Minnesota bear baiting regulations to help you follow them properly.

The first step is to know what you “cannot” use as bait for bears, below is a list of materials that are not allowed according to Minnesota hunting regulations.

  • More than 25% of an intact mammal carcass
  • Mammal meat that contains bones
  • Mammal bones
  • Waste containing; bottles, cans, plastic, paper or metal
  • Non-biodegradable materials
  • Swine (expection: cured pork)

Quick Note: You may not leave unattended 55-gallon drums, containers, garbage bags, pails plastic at a bear bait station.

In order to establish a station you must register it with the Minnesota DNR. You must mail in the required forms for an established bait station by the next available postal service day the bait station is created. All registered bait stations must display a sign of at least 6″x10″, which must be made of plastic, metal or wood. The sign must include the DNR number and driver’s license number of the owner OR the full name, address and phone number of the bait station operator. The sign must be placed no lower than 6 feet and no higher than 10 feet off the ground, and must be within 20 feet of the bait station.

You’re not allowed to establish a bear bait station within 150 yards of any registered camping site or within half a mile of a garbage dump. You cannot setup a bait station in bear permit area 22.

It should be duly noted that NO HUNTER is allowed to harvest a white bear, which was introduced in 1998. You’re not allowed to disturb bear dens or use methods to draw a bear from its den or harvest one near its den. Dogs are not allowed to be used as hunting aids, nor can you practice training dogs on bears. We hope this article has helped you learn more on bear baiting in Minnesota, if you’d like to learn more about bear hunting in general then continue below.

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